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There are clearly some circumstances in which Americans are willing to support – at great expense and with little political turmoil – universal, fare-free public transportation. The question of why we are willing to do so for school public transportation, and for virtually no other purpose, is one worth talking about.

Chances are that demand management can deliver improvements more cheaply, more quickly, with greater benefits to society, and with much lower risk to taxpayers and the public than laying more asphalt.

When it comes to U.S. action on global warming, the glass is both half-empty and half-full.

The world’s largest tunneling machine, stuck 60 feet under downtown Seattle since December 2013, is causing even more headaches these days. Bertha – that’s the machine’s name – is teaching a hard lesson about sunk costs – and how trying to dig a project out of a hole can make matters much, much worse.

When the Clean Water Act is applied to American waterways, good things can happen. Our recent report, Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act's Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays, highlights waterways where the Clean Water Act's protections and improvement provisions have had positive effects. Polluted waterways have been cleaned up, pristine waterways have been preserved, and threatened waterways have been protected. All waterways deserve these opportunities.

In this blog series, we'll showcase individual case studies from the report. The next installment looks at a Maine river that helped inspire the Clean Water Act.

We are at a critical moment for solar power. It is already on the rise, growing at an exponential rate.  And with the benefit of smart public policies, it could get very big, very fast. The International Energy Agency predicts solar energy will be the largest source of energy in the world by 2050. Will the rapid growth in solar energy continue? That depends, in part, on whether policymakers can resist a determined push by fossil fuel interests and utilities to derail the emerging solar energy economy.

When the Clean Water Act is applied to American waterways, good things can happen. Our recent report, Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act's Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays, highlights waterways where the Clean Water Act's protections and improvement provisions have had positive effects. Polluted waterways have been cleaned up, pristine waterways have been preserved, and threatened waterways have been protected. All waterways deserve these opportunities.

In this blog series, we'll showcase individual case studies from the report. The next installment looks at agricultural pollution in Illinois.

America’s water resources are precious, and in grave danger. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says 40 percent of American waterways that have been assessed are too polluted to support intended uses such as fishing or swimming. Pollution threats come from factory farms, industrial facilities and a variety of other sources. Meanwhile, inefficient use of water, along with recent drought, has left less water available for Americans to use and enjoy.

When the Clean Water Act is applied to American waterways, good things can happen. Our recent report, Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act's Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays, highlights waterways where the Clean Water Act's protections and improvement provisions have had positive effects. Polluted waterways have been cleaned up, pristine waterways have been preserved, and threatened waterways have been protected. All waterways deserve these opportunities.

In this blog series, we'll showcase individual case studies from the report. The next installment looks at stormwater runoff management in Connecticut.

As global temperatures rise, our power plants continue to release millions of tons of carbon dioxide every year. If the world is to avoid the worst impacts of global warming, America must take the lead. Dramatically expanding wind power is a great place to start.

The way we produce and consume food is bad for the environment and bad for us. Deforestation, water contamination, diet-based disease and food safety scares aren’t minor glitches in an otherwise well designed system. Rather, they are inevitable outgrowths of a system dependent on chemical fertilizer, expanding croplands, massive subsidies and weak oversight.

When the Clean Water Act is applied to American waterways, good things can happen. Our recent report, Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act's Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays, highlights waterways where the Clean Water Act's protections and improvement provisions have had positive effects. Polluted waterways have been cleaned up, pristine waterways have been preserved, and threatened waterways have been protected. All waterways deserve these opportunities.

In this blog series, we'll showcase individual case studies from the report. The next installment is Powderhorn Lake in Minnesota.

When the Clean Water Act is applied to American waterways, good things can happen. Our recent report, Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act's Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays, highlights waterways where the Clean Water Act's protections and improvement provisions have had positive effects. Polluted waterways have been cleaned up, pristine waterways have been preserved, and threatened waterways have been protected. All waterways deserve these opportunities.

In this blog series, we'll showcase individual case studies from the report. The next installment is the Willamette River in Oregon.

Our current, outdated electricity grid relies on polluting fossil fuels to provide us with electricity - the time is now to harness America's vast solar energy resources and stop relying on these dirty energy sources. Our new report, Star Power: The Growing Role of Solar Energy in America, calls on local, state and federal government officials to set clear goals and adopt strong pro-solar policies to generate at least 10 percent of America's electricity from solar energy by 2030.

The good news, if you can call it that, is that our transportation policy has become so absurd that its brokenness is increasingly accepted by folks across the political spectrum. Not everyone has the same diagnosis or recommendations for treatment, of course, but the opportunity for full, honest and creative debate about our transportation needs and priorities has never been greater.

When the Clean Water Act is applied to American waterways, good things can happen. Our recent report, Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act's Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays, highlights waterways where the Clean Water Act's protections and improvement provisions have had positive effects. Polluted waterways have been cleaned up, pristine waterways have been preserved, and threatened waterways have been protected. All waterways deserve these opportunities.

In this blog series, we'll showcase individual case studies from the report. The next installment is the Anacostia River in Maryland and Washington D.C.

If you wanted to design a public policy to maximize rush hour congestion, you’d be hard pressed to do better than the commuter parking subsidy.

If I am a suburban commuter, I am not going to be motivated to endure months or years of construction-related delays and higher gas taxes or tolls in order to make someone else’s commute faster, put more trucks on the road, make a suburban real estate developer rich, or allow for the construction of a shopping mall with a restaurant that I might one day drive to with my family. I want my own commute to get better, and quick.

When the Clean Water Act is applied to American waterways, good things can happen. Our recent report, Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act's Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays, highlights waterways where the Clean Water Act's protections and improvement provisions have had positive effects. Polluted waterways have been cleaned up, pristine waterways have been preserved, and threatened waterways have been protected. All waterways deserve these opportunities.

In this blog series, we'll showcase individual case studies from the report. The third installment is California's Big Sur region and Monterey Bay.

Our September Highway Boondoggles report has sparked lively discussion about the wisdom and necessity of the 11 questionable highway expansion projects we highlighted. Now, new attention is being focused on other projects that weren’t covered in our report, but have a similarly dubious claim for public support and investment.

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