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Our new report, Catching the Rain, written with Environment Texas Research & Policy Center, identifies an environmentally-friendly, low-cost solution to threats to water quality from stormwater pollution: green stormwater infrastructure. These are residential, commercial or public systems that absorb rainwater by incorporating or mimicking nature, including rain gardens, permeable pavement, green roofs and rain cisterns.

In 2016, with support from the Hewlett Foundation, Frontier Group released two reports outlining the vision and policy steps to achieve a carbon-free transportation future. We held a public webinar in January 2017 discussing what comes next. Watch the video here.

People living in Salt Lake City, the San Francisco Bay region and Wyoming’s Upper Green River Basin have had something in common recently: poor air quality.

A new study about forest loss around the world makes me wonder: When will we be satisfied with the goods and lifestyle we have instead of seeking to acquire more? When will we quit cutting down trees, digging up coal and drilling for oil, and decide that there’s value to maintaining a livable planet?

The U.S. still spends vast sums of money to build new highways and widen existing ones.

There are good reasons to believe that the recent rapid rate of growth of vehicle travel will not continue for long. But there are also many reasons to support public policy changes that will give more Americans the option not to drive and further reduce growth in vehicle travel in the years ahead.

A few highlights from our work in 2016, including envisioning a new transportation future, highlighting the promise of solar energy, exposing the dangers of fracking, encouraging government transparency, making sense of the election, and more.

The main hurdle inhibiting not only public transportation but also relatively low-cost solutions such as bicycling and pedestrian infrastructure is not one of cost or governmental competence, but rather one of values.

Americans are exposed to hundreds of chemicals on a daily basis. They are in our personal care products, our cookware, our furniture and our electronics. They are used on our lawns and on the crops that produce our food. They are also in our bodies.

Banks play a crucial role in society: They keep our money safe and put it to work. But today, banks are making an increasing amount of money from the fees they collect from their customers. In Big Banks, Big Overdraft Fees, we found that large banks reported collecting $8.4 billion in overdraft fees in the first three quarters of 2016 – a 3.6% increase over the same period in 2015.

Public lands are critical environmental resources. They help to preserve ecosystems that may not find protection otherwise, and serve as field laboratories for scientists, vacation sites for families hoping to hook their children on nature, and sanctuaries for wildlife. But, public lands have also historically been the site of resource extraction and other activities that leave lasting marks on the landscape.

America’s agricultural system increasingly produces unhealthy food at significant cost to our environment and our health. These costs are paid by eaters and taxpayers – people like you and me.

For a decade, the United States seemed to be creeping away from our extreme dependence on fossil fuel-burning cars and trucks. Then, everything changed.

Optimism and hope are not the same thing, and there are some reasons to be hopeful that progress on climate will continue, even during a Trump administration.

America, a nation that has been resolutely future-oriented throughout its history, now risks turning decisively back toward the past.

Trumpism exists on the edge of the map where the dragons are. Beyond that, there’s nothing.

If you care about making social change of any kind, the inclination to worship data and analytics and to downplay vision and values is one you need to fight hard against.

There is a direct line from the policy decisions the United States has made over the last century – decisions that have almost universally moved the country toward deepening dependence on fossil fuel-powered personal cars – to the climate-altering reality of today.

The vast majority of the 16 recent solar cost-benefit analyses we reviewed for Shining Rewards found that, even with full retail net metering, solar owners provide a net benefit to the grid. And the analyses finding otherwise were largely commissioned by utilities.

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