Transit’s role in efficiently moving large numbers of people to and through our cities will remain important even in a world of driverless cars.

Our new interactive extreme weather map, released with Environment America, shows weather-related disasters in every U.S. county over the last five years.

Fracking threatens health in Pennsylvania and Texas; a national network of special interests is attacking solar energy; roads still don't pay for themselves... and more.

The trend toward vehicle leasing is consistent with what appears to be a broader shift to a “rentership society” and may signal that Americans are willing to change their relationship with their cars from one that is long-term and durable to one that is contingent and flexible.

Antibiotic resistant infections kill tens of thousands of American each year. So it was encouraging to see two actions to reduce the overuse of antibiotics on factory farms taken in October: A new policy in California to restrict antibiotic overuse on livestock, and an announcement by Subway that it will phase out the sale of meat raised with antibiotics over the coming years.

For now, low interest rates, long loan terms and generous lease deals are enabling many consumers to get “more car” than they otherwise dreamed possible. But the intoxicating feeling of driving an exciting new car comes with a potential hangover down the road.

In recent days new research has emerged that specifically highlights fracking’s impact on reproductive health, and adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that exposure to fracking chemicals can have particularly damaging impacts when it comes to pregnancy and prenatal health.

Residents of the Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which includes Pittsburgh, suffer from among the worst air quality in the nation. For example, the county ranks in the top 0.3 percent of all counties in the U.S. for cancer risk from air pollutants discharged from point-source facilities.

The “generational change in mindset” is not limited to changes in personal behavior or lifestyle preferences. Millennials also have differing views on transportation policy questions than older Americans.

If car sales are being sustained in large part by a lax lending environment and cheap credit, what will happen if and when interest rates rise or when mounting losses on bad loans trigger a pull-back in lending?

The battle over solar energy could use some sunlight. That’s why we just released Blocking the Sun, a new report that pulls back the veil on 12 utilities and fossil fuel groups that are working to undermine American solar energy. 

Lack of access to credit helped crash the auto market during the recession. Free and easy access to cheap credit is helping to supercharge it now.

During his American introduction last week in Washington, D.C., Pope Francis addressed not only religion, but also a variety of pressing societal concerns. In particular, he spent more time encouraging action on climate change than he did on any other topic.

The vision of the future dreamed up by General Motors largely came to pass … but utopia did not follow.

FracFocus’ long-awaited decision to open the data for broader use allowed us to develop an estimate of the amount of chemicals used in fracking on University of Texas lands. 

Our new report released today, Childhood Hunger in America’s Suburbs, found that since the Great Recession nearly half of all public school children newly eligible for free and reduced-price lunches live in the suburbs – far more than live in inner cities or rural areas. And while urban areas are still home to the most total eligible children, that could soon change.

Forward-thinking cities around the country and around the globe are improving bike infrastructure because they are coming to recognize bicycling as a healthy, affordable, efficient, eco-friendly and fun way for people to get around.

States with good solar policy are seeing a solar revolution – and that’s not just in sunny states like California, but also northern states like Massachusetts. The flipside is also true: States without good solar policy – like Florida, the Sunshine State – are seeing lackluster solar growth.

The average number of hours spent in traffic by an auto commuter hasn’t budged since 2006.

Solar energy is booming in popularity, and that has a lot to do with its rapidly declining price. Google’s new Sunroof project (for now available in Boston, San Francisco, and Fresno) taps into some advanced technology to give consumers perhaps the easiest way yet to see their opportunity for big savings potential from installing solar panels.


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