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Our new report with Environment America, Doubling Down on Climate Progress: The Benefits of a Stronger Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, explores what RGGI has accomplished in the region so far, and what the program could accomplish if strengthened.

Even when drilling companies follow all the rules, fracking is a dirty and dangerous activity. Yet drilling companies also regularly violate laws and regulations meant to protect the environment and the public, magnifying the risk. Fracking Failures 2017, written with PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center, finds that gas drillers across Pennsylvania continue to violate laws with little consequence.

Highway money may not be fungible, but political capital is – and every moment local officials spend trying to secure funding for new highways is time they could spend addressing the real issues that actually stand between success and failure for Rust Belt communities in the 21st century.

The problem is that we often provide interpretations on the basis of “best available data” that is either of sketchy provenance or subject to significant later revision. That breeds snap judgments and bad decisions.

Relying on me – an ordinary consumer with little detailed understanding of food production and virtually no information – to use my decision-making power to move the food system toward greater sustainability is absurd. 

A product made from oil-derived plastic and other nonrenewable resources shouldn’t be designed to be thrown away after just a year of use. But that’s how far too many items are made today, and customers aren’t even that surprised by this.

Promising a lifestyle that is impossible to deliver – and that in many ways was never all it was cracked up to be – is how you burn public trust.

Fossil fuel and allied interests should not be permitted to turn America into a living museum of obsolete, pollution-spewing technologies.

Our new report, Catching the Rain, written with Environment Texas Research & Policy Center, identifies an environmentally-friendly, low-cost solution to threats to water quality from stormwater pollution: green stormwater infrastructure. These are residential, commercial or public systems that absorb rainwater by incorporating or mimicking nature, including rain gardens, permeable pavement, green roofs and rain cisterns.

In 2016, with support from the Hewlett Foundation, Frontier Group released two reports outlining the vision and policy steps to achieve a carbon-free transportation future. We held a public webinar in January 2017 discussing what comes next. Watch the video here.

People living in Salt Lake City, the San Francisco Bay region and Wyoming’s Upper Green River Basin have had something in common recently: poor air quality.

A new study about forest loss around the world makes me wonder: When will we be satisfied with the goods and lifestyle we have instead of seeking to acquire more? When will we quit cutting down trees, digging up coal and drilling for oil, and decide that there’s value to maintaining a livable planet?

The U.S. still spends vast sums of money to build new highways and widen existing ones.

There are good reasons to believe that the recent rapid rate of growth of vehicle travel will not continue for long. But there are also many reasons to support public policy changes that will give more Americans the option not to drive and further reduce growth in vehicle travel in the years ahead.

A few highlights from our work in 2016, including envisioning a new transportation future, highlighting the promise of solar energy, exposing the dangers of fracking, encouraging government transparency, making sense of the election, and more.

The main hurdle inhibiting not only public transportation but also relatively low-cost solutions such as bicycling and pedestrian infrastructure is not one of cost or governmental competence, but rather one of values.

Americans are exposed to hundreds of chemicals on a daily basis. They are in our personal care products, our cookware, our furniture and our electronics. They are used on our lawns and on the crops that produce our food. They are also in our bodies.

Banks play a crucial role in society: They keep our money safe and put it to work. But today, banks are making an increasing amount of money from the fees they collect from their customers. In Big Banks, Big Overdraft Fees, we found that large banks reported collecting $8.4 billion in overdraft fees in the first three quarters of 2016 – a 3.6% increase over the same period in 2015.

Public lands are critical environmental resources. They help to preserve ecosystems that may not find protection otherwise, and serve as field laboratories for scientists, vacation sites for families hoping to hook their children on nature, and sanctuaries for wildlife. But, public lands have also historically been the site of resource extraction and other activities that leave lasting marks on the landscape.

America’s agricultural system increasingly produces unhealthy food at significant cost to our environment and our health. These costs are paid by eaters and taxpayers – people like you and me.

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