Our Research

Cars and Global Warming: Policy Options for Rhode Island to Reduce Global Warming Pollution from Cars and Light Trucks

Cars and light trucks produce 25 percent of Rhode Island’s global warming pollution. Cars and Global Warming explains how Rhode Island could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program could begin to reduce Rhode Island’s contribution to global warming.

(December 2005)

Air pollution, mercury-tainted fish, peeling lead, pesticides and other commonly used toxic chemicals threaten the health of Maryland’s children. Though there are many powerful policies available for the state to use in reducing pollution, Maryland has adopted only a few of them. Maryland Children’s Environmental Health Report Card examines the most common environmental threats to children’s health and evaluate and grades Maryland’s response to these problems.

(December 2005)
Power Plants and Global Warming: Impacts on Maryland and Strategies for Reducing Emissions

Seven coal-fired power plants in Maryland produce nearly one third of the state’s emissions of carbon dioxide, the most common global warming pollutant. Power Plants and Global Warming demonstrates that Maryland can reduce its contribution to global warming and meet its electricity needs by tapping its energy efficiency potential and developing renewable energy resources. The first step to reducing emissions is adopting a cap on global warming emissions from coal-fired power plants.

(December 2005)
Ready to Roll: The Benefits of Today's Advanced-Technology Vehicles for Washington

Despite tighter automobile emission standards over the past three decades, many states continue to face significant automobile-related air pollution problems. Ready to Roll: The Benefits of Today’s Advanced-Technology Vehicles for Washington outlines how the use of advanced-technology vehicles—those that use cleaner, alternative fuels or new technological advances to achieve dramatically improved environmental performance—could alleviate air pollution problems while reducing global warming emissions and enhancing the state’s energy security. The report also documents that, although advanced technology vehicles are “ready to roll,” availability of these vehicles is limited in states that have not yet adopted the California Clean Car Standards.

(December 2005)
Ready to Roll: The Benefits of Today's Advanced Technology Vehicles for Oregon

Despite tighter automobile emission standards over the past three decades, many states continue to face significant automobile-related air pollution problems. Ready to Roll: The Benefits of Today’s Advanced-Technology Vehicles for Oregon outlines how the use of advanced-technology vehicles—those that use cleaner, alternative fuels or new technological advances to achieve dramatically improved environmental performance—could alleviate air pollution problems while reducing global warming emissions and enhancing the state’s energy security. The report also documents that, although advanced technology vehicles are “ready to roll,” availability of these vehicles is limited in states that have not yet adopted the California Clean Car Standards.

(November 2005)

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