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Toxic Ten: The Allegheny County Polluters That Are Fouling Our Air and Threatening Our Health

Residents of the Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which includes Pittsburgh, suffer from among the worst air quality in the nation. For example, the county ranks in the top 0.3 percent of all counties in the U.S. for cancer risk from air pollutants discharged from point-source facilities. Toxic Ten: The Allegheny County Polluters That Are Fouling Our Air and Threatening Our Health profiles the top 10 emitters of toxic industrial air pollution in Allegheny County. The facilities are ranked by the relative toxicity of the air pollution they reported releasing in 2013, according to EPA data. 

(October 2015)
Dangerous and Close: Fracking Near Pennsylvania's Most Vulnerable Residents

Since 2007, more than 9,000 wells employing fracking have been drilled in Pennsylvania - many of them in close proximity to schools, day care facilities, hospitals and nursing homes. Dangerous and Close tracks the spread of fracking ever closer to Pennsylvania's most vulnerable residents and details the environmental and health threats fracking poses to Pennsylvanians.

(October 2015)
Blocking the Sun: 12 Utilities and Fossil Fuel Interests That Are Undermining American Solar Power

Blocking the Sun pulls back the veil on 12 of the utilities, fossil fuel companies, front groups and special interest think tanks that are fighting solar power in America. 

(October 2015)
Childhood Hunger in America's Suburbs: The Changing Geography of Poverty

Childhood Hunger in America’s Suburbs shows the changing geography of childhood hunger at a time of growing suburban poverty. This report demonstrates that the risk of childhood hunger is an issue affecting nearly every American community, including communities that might otherwise think that hunger is a problem that occurs “somewhere else.”

(September 2015)
Fracking on University of Texas Lands: The Environmental Effects of Hydraulic Fracturing on Land Owned by the University of Texas System

As the state’s flagship educational institution and a significant landholder, the University of Texas has a particular responsibility to protect the environment, Texas’ special places and public health. Fracking on university-owned lands, which fund UT and the Texas A&M System, put pressure on scarce water resources, introduced hundreds of millions of pounds of toxic substances to the environment, worsened global warming, and threatened migratory birds and endangered species. Fracking on University of Texas Lands: The Environmental Effects of Hydraulic Fracturing on Land Owned by the University of Texas System quantifies this damage this dangerous practice has wrought on university lands.

(September 2015)

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