Reports on Consumer Protection

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Consumer Protection. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

Credit Cards, Consumer Complaints: The CFPB's Consumer Complaint Database Gets Real Results for Credit Card Holders

Despite the benefits to consumers brought by enactment of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (Credit CARD) Act of 2009, consumer complaints about credit cards remain common. Credit Cards, Consumer Complaints examines the more than 25,000 complaints Americans filed with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau about credit cards between November 2011 and September 2013 to identify the companies receiving the most complaints and the most frequent problems consumers are experiencing in the credit card marketplace.

(March 2014)
Debt Collectors, Debt Complaints: The CFPB’s Consumer Complaint Database Gets Real Results for Consumers

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) was established in 2010 in the wake of the worst financial crisis in decades. Its mission is to identify dangerous and unfair financial practices, to educate consumers about these practices, and to regulate the financial institutions that perpetuate them. This is the fifth in a series of reports that review complaints to the CFPB nationally and on a state-by-state level. In this report we explore consumer complaints about debt collection, with the aim of uncovering patterns in the problems consumers are experiencing with debt collectors and documenting the role of the CFPB in helping consumers successfully resolve their complaints.

 

(February 2014)
Big Credit Bureaus, Big Complaints: The CFPB's Consumer Complaint Database Gets Real Results for Victims of Credit Reporting Errors

One in 20 Americans has an error on one or more of their credit reports that could affect the prices they pay for financial products. Big Credit Reports, Big Complaints - the third in a series of analyses of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's (CFPB) Consumer Complaint Database - documents the frequent problems consumers experience with credit reports, as well as the major credit bureaus' responses to consumer complaints. It shows that the CFPB complaints process has helped thousands of consumers fix erroneous information on their credit reports, obtain the free annual credit reports to which they are legally entitled, and obtain other forms of relief from major credit bureaus.

(November 2013)
Private Loans, Public Complaints: The CFPB's Consumer Complaint Database Gets Real Results for Student Borrowers

Private student loans (PSLs) are typically far more risky and expensive for consumers seeking a way to pay for college than federally-backed student loans. Private student loans, like credit cards, generally offer variable interest rates that are higher for those borrowers with the least means. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's (CFPB) Consumer Complaint Database sheds light on the problems borrowers face with private student loans and enables the public to evaluate which lenders and servicers receive the most complaints. Private Loans, Public Complaints is the second in a series of reports examining patterns in complaints to the CFPB about various sectors of the financial services industry and how those complaints are resolved.

(October 2013)
Big Banks, Big Complaints: CFPB's Consumer Complaint Database Gets Real Results for Consumers

Established in 2010, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) helps protect consumers from dangerous and unfair practices in the marketplace for financial services. Addressing consumer complaints is a major part of the CFPB's mission, and the agency's Consumer Complaint Database is a rich source of information about the challenges consumers face in the financial marketplace. Big Banks, Big Complaints is the first of a series of reports examining patterns in consumer complaints to the CFPB, focusing specifically on complaints about bank accounts and services.

(September 2013)
Still in the Dark: California Consumers' Search for Answers About How Companies Share Their Personal Information

Consumers often have little knowledge of, or control over, how companies with which they do business share their personal information. In 2003, California enacted the first-of-its-kind “Shine the Light” law, which gave consumers tools to learn about sharing of their personal information. Still in the Dark reports on California consumers’ experiences with using the law to find out about the sharing of personal information and concludes that both companies and policy-makers need to do a better job of protecting consumers’ privacy.

(December 2007)
Consolidation of Power: How Exelon's Bid to Acquire PSEG Could Raise Rates, Reduce Reliability, and Risk Public Safety

In December 2004, Chicago-based Exelon Corporation announced plans to acquire Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), the last remaining New Jersey-based energy company that hasn’t been taken over by a large out-of-state corporation. Consolidation of Power analyzes the risks this deal poses to consumers in New Jersey’s deregulated electricity market—who depend upon vigorous competition between energy suppliers to get a fair deal for reliable service.

(November 2005)
Financial Privacy In The States: How Consumers Benefit From Personal Information Safeguards

Federal regulation riddled with loopholes has left large bank conglomerates and other financial institutions with too much leeway to share consumers’ private information and too little responsibility for the consequences. Financial Privacy in the States documents the growing concerns that Americans have about financial privacy, presents a survey of state laws that have helped fill regulatory gaps in the financial privacy sphere, and provides an estimate of the economic burden consumers currently bear as a result of inadequate privacy safeguards.

(February 2004)
After the Blackout: Achieving a Cleaner, More Reliable Electric System

The Northeast blackout of 2003 showed yet again that today's cumbersome, centralized power grid linked to fossil fuel-fired and nuclear power plants is a costly, unreliable and environmentally destructive anachronism. After the Blackout, a paper issued three weeks after the blackout cut power to 50 million people in the U.S. and Canada, distills the lessons of the blackout and calls for the creation of a decentralized, resilient and consumer-focused electric system that taps the nation’s ample potential for energy efficiency, clean renewable power, and distributed generation.

(September 2003)