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Renewable Energy 100: The Course to a Carbon-Free Campus

America’s institutions of higher education can play a crucial role in the fight to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. Colleges and universities across the country should aggressively deploy clean energy on campus, setting a goal of getting 100 percent of their energy from clean renewable sources.

(March 2017)
Catching the Rain: How Green Infrastructure Can Reduce Flooding and Improve Water Quality in Texas

Flooding has caused significant damage in Texas in recent years, and pollution from stormwater runoff poses a persistent threat to local waterways. As more land is paved over and climate change increases the frequency of heavy rains, the risk of flooding is likely to increase. Catching the Rain explains how green stormwater infrastructure can be a cost-effective, environmentally-friendly way to limit future damage from flooding and stormwater pollution.

(February 2017)
Big Banks, Big Overdraft Fees: The CFPB Defends Consumers Against Harmful and Deceptive Fees

Through the first three quarters of 2016, 626 large banks reported collecting $8.4 billion in revenue from overdraft and NSF fees, an increase of 3.6 percent over the same period in 2015. American consumers should look to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which has already enforced overdraft regulations and returned millions of dollars to consumers, to take new action to prevent unfair overdraft fees.

(December 2016)
Blocking the Sun: Utilities and Fossil Fuel Interests That Are Undermining American Solar Power - 2016 Edition

Behind the scenes, electric utilities, fossil fuel interests and powerful industry front groups have begun chipping away at the key policies that have put solar energy on the map in the United States – often in the face of strong objections from a supportive public.

(December 2016)
50 Steps Toward Carbon-Free Transportation: Rethinking U.S. Transportation Policy to Fight Global Warming

America’s transportation system has emerged as Climate Enemy #1, with cars, trucks and other vehicles now representing the nation’s largest source of carbon pollution, and America producing more transportation carbon pollution per capita than any other major industrialized nation. There is hope, however. New technologies and emerging social trends, from the resurgence of interest in walkable neighborhoods to advances in electric vehicles – create new opportunities to move the nation toward a zero-carbon transportation system, and to do it in ways that improve our health and well-being and support a vibrant economy.

(October 2016)

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