Our Research

The Innovative Transportation Index: The Cities Where New Technologies and Tools Can Reduce Your Need to Own a Car

Find out how your city ranked! And click here for shareable graphics you can use to tell all your friends about how great your favorite city is.

 
 

 

 

Rapid technological advances have enabled the creation of new transportation tools that make it possible for more Americans to live full and engaged lives without owning a car. Many of these new tools have been in existence for less than a decade – some for less than five years – but they have spread rapidly to cities across the United States.

 

This report reviews the availability of 11 technology-enabled transportation services – including online ridesourcing, carsharing, ridesharing, taxi hailing, static and real-time transit information, multi-modal apps, and virtual transit ticketing – in 70 U.S. cities. It finds that residents of 19 cities, with a combined population of nearly 28 million people, have access to eight or more of these services, with other cities catching up rapidly.

(February 2015)
Fracking Failures: Oil and Gas Industry Environmental Violations in Pennsylvania and What They Mean for the U.S.
More Wind, Less Warming: How American Wind Energy's Rapid Growth Can Help Solve Global Warming

Wind power is on the rise across America, increasing 24-fold since 2001. But with the urgent need for action against global warming and America's tremendous wind energy potential, wind power has the potential to make an even greater contribution to a cleaner future less dependent on fossil fuels. More Wind, Less Warming documents American wind energy's role in reducing carbon pollution today and shows how a future of 30% wind energy can help the U.S. meet its obligations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, protecting ourselves and future generations from the worst impacts of global warming.

(December 2014)
Trouble in Toyland: The 29th Annual Survey of Toy Safety

Despite strong standards for toy safety established by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), toy companies continue to sell potentially dangerous toys. Trouble in Toyland explains the types of hazards that toys may present to children, and identifies specific examples of those hazards found on store shelves. This year's report includes numerous choking hazards and five toys with concentrations of toxics exceeding federal standards. The continued presence of these hazards in toys highlights the need for constant vigilance on the part of government agencies and the public to ensure that children do not end up playing with unsafe toys.

(December 2014)
Star Power: The Growing Role of Solar Energy in America

America could meet its energy needs by capturing just a sliver of the virtually limitless and pollution-free energy that strikes the nation every day in the form of sunlight. With solar installation costs falling, the efficiency of solar cells rising, and the threats of air pollution and global warming ever-looming, solar power is becoming a more attractive and widespread source of energy every day. Star Power: The Growing Role of Solar Energy in America challenges our local, state and federal government officials to set strong goals and implement pro-solar policies to spur America to meet at least 10 percent of our nation’s electricity needs with solar power by 2030.

(November 2014)

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