Blog Posts tagged transportation

If America is to shift its focus toward transportation investments that deliver greater societal benefits for less money, it is important to be able to recognize the signs that a given highway expansion project just might be a boondoggle.

Highway money may not be fungible, but political capital is – and every moment local officials spend trying to secure funding for new highways is time they could spend addressing the real issues that actually stand between success and failure for Rust Belt communities in the 21st century.

The problem is that we often provide interpretations on the basis of “best available data” that is either of sketchy provenance or subject to significant later revision. That breeds snap judgments and bad decisions.

Promising a lifestyle that is impossible to deliver – and that in many ways was never all it was cracked up to be – is how you burn public trust.

In 2016, with support from the Hewlett Foundation, Frontier Group released two reports outlining the vision and policy steps to achieve a carbon-free transportation future. We held a public webinar in January 2017 discussing what comes next. Watch the video here.

The U.S. still spends vast sums of money to build new highways and widen existing ones.

There are good reasons to believe that the recent rapid rate of growth of vehicle travel will not continue for long. But there are also many reasons to support public policy changes that will give more Americans the option not to drive and further reduce growth in vehicle travel in the years ahead.

For a decade, the United States seemed to be creeping away from our extreme dependence on fossil fuel-burning cars and trucks. Then, everything changed.

America, a nation that has been resolutely future-oriented throughout its history, now risks turning decisively back toward the past.

There is a direct line from the policy decisions the United States has made over the last century – decisions that have almost universally moved the country toward deepening dependence on fossil fuel-powered personal cars – to the climate-altering reality of today.

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